EDITORIAL DESIGN :: QUOTES ABOUT THE 1960S

Some of them define the idea of what the magazine should be about, more or less, a modern take on the 1960s…quotation

“If someone thinks that peace and love are just a cliche that must have been left behind in the 60s, that’s a problem. Peace and love are eternal.” ― John Lennon

“The thing the sixties did was to show us the possibilities and the responsibility that we all had. It wasn’t the answer. It just gave us a glimpse of the possibility.” ― John Lennon

“The people who invented the twenty-first century were pot-smoking, sandal-wearing hippies from the West Coast like Steve, because they saw differently,” he said. “The hierarchical systems of the East Coast, England, Germany, and Japan do not encourage this different thinking. The sixties produced an anarchic mind-set that is great for imagining a world not yet in existence.” ― Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs

“FAITES L’AMOUR ET RECOMMENCEZ (make love and make it again)” ― Anouk Markovits, I am Forbidden

“The importance of Liking Yourself is a notion that fell heavily out of favor during the coptic, anti-ego frenzy of the Acid Era–but nobody guessed back then that the experiment might churn up this kind of hangover: a whole subculture of frightened illiterates with no faith in anything.” ― Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail ’72

“The 1960s: A lot of people remember hating President Lyndon Baines Johnson and loving Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison, depending on the point of view. God rest their souls.” ― Richard Brautigan, The Tokyo-Montana Express

“So exiled have even basic questions of freedom become from the political vocabulary that they sound musty and ridiculous, and vulnerable to the ultimate badge of shame-‘That’s so 60’s!’-the entire decade having been mocked so effectively that social protest seems outlandish and ‘so last century,’ just another style excess like love beads and Nehru jackets. No, rebellion won’t pose a problem for this social order.” ― Laura Kipnis, Against Love: A Polemic

“On first impressions, John seemed more cynical and brash than the others, Ringo the most endearing, Paul was cute, and George, with velvet brown eyes and dark chestnut hair, was the best-looking man I’d ever seen. At the break for lunch I found myself sitting next to him, whether by accident or design I have never been sure. We were both shy and spoke hardly a word to each other, but being close to him was electrifying.” ― Pattie Boyd, Wonderful Tonight

“The cultural situation in America today (and indeed in all Western societies) is determined by the cultural earthquake of the nineteen-sixties, the consequences of which are very much in evidence. What began as a counter-culture only some thirty years ago has achieved dominance in elite culture and, from the bastions of the latter (in the educational system, the media, the higher reaches of the law, and key positions within government bureaucracy), has penetrated both popular culture and the corporate world. It is characterized by an amalgam of both sentiments and beliefs that cannot be easily catalogued, though terms like ‘progressive,’ ’emancipators or ‘liberationist’ serve to describe it. Intellectually, this new culture is legitimated by a number of loosely connected ideologies— leftover Marxism, feminism and other sexual identity doctrines, racial and ethnic separatism, various brands of therapeutic gospels and of environmentalism. An underlying theme is antagonism toward Western culture in general and American culture in particular. A prevailing spirit is one of intolerance and a grim orthodoxy, precisely caught in the phrase “political correctness.” ― Peter L. Berger

“…And eventually, he (Charles Manson) testified to an empty court, as Bugliosi had convinced the presiding judge Older, that Manson’s hypnotic powers might convince the jury he was innocent.” ― Nikolas Schreck

“Cops and Robbers in 1965 England was still a kind of Ealing comedy: crimes rarely involved firearms. The denizens of F-wing were losers in a game they had been playing against the cops. In queues for exercise, the constant questions were ‘What you in for, mate?’, followed by ‘What you reckon you’ll get?’ When Freddie and I responded with ‘Suspicion of drug possession’ and ‘We’re innocent, we’ll get off’ they would burst into laughter, offering: ‘Listen, mate, they wouldn’t have you in here if they had any intention of letting you off. You’re living in dreamland, you are.” ― Joe Boyd, White Bicycles: Making Music in the 1960s

“…TV was entertainment of the last resort. There was nothing on during the day in the summer other than game shows and soap operas. Besides, a TV-watching child was considered available for chores: take out the trash, clean your room, pick up that mess, fold those towels, mow the lawn… the list was endless. We all became adept at chore-avoidance. Staying out of sight was a reliable strategy. Drawing or painting was another: to my mother, making art trumped making beds. A third choir-avoidance technique was to read. A kid with his or her nose in a book is a kid who is not fighting, yelling, throwing, breaking things, bleeding, whining, or otherwise creating a Mom-size headache. Reading a book was almost like being invisible – a good thing for all concerned.” ― Pete Hautman, Libraries of Minnesota

“For historical currents do not irresistibly propel themselves and everyone in their path. No matter what their broader structural or ideological roots, they both carry along and are carried along by people, who are not merely passengers of history, but pilots as well.” ― Doug McAdam, Freedom Summer

“We’ll fight back, we’ll fight back, we’ll fight back,” a man near Doctor Stockstill was chanting. Stockstill looked at him in astonishment, wondering who he would fight back against. Things were falling on them; did the man intend to fall back upward into the sky in some sort of revenge?” ― Philip K. Dick, Dr. Bloodmoney

“During the 1960s, I think, people forgot what emotions were supposed to be. And I don’t think they’ve ever remembered.” ― Andy Warhol

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